How to Turn Your Non-Fat Powdered Milk into Whole Milk

by Erich

If you’re one of those who can’t stand drinking non-fat powdered milk (or have children that won’t touch it) but still nonetheless have it as part of your food storage — there’s hope. Turning your non-fat powdered milk into whole milk (or 1% or 2%) is a relatively easy process.

From Powdered Milk to Whole Milk

All it involves is a little understanding of chemistry and some extra items that should be part of your food storage anyways.

The only difference between reconstituted non-fat powdered milk and whole milk is the absence or presence of fat (this is what allows non-fat powdered milk to store for so long). But improving the taste by getting the fat back into the milk is not as easy as pouring some in and shaking. I’m sure you’ve seen what happens when you try to combine water and oil.

And now for the chemistry.

In order to mix two liquids together that otherwise would not blend (oil and milk in this case) requires what is called an emulsifier. And two of the most common emulsifiers used in recipes are eggs and honey — both of which are excellent long-term food storage items.

In the tables below I’ve put together some simple recipes that you can use to make 1%, 2%, or whole milk from a combination of powdered milk, vegetable oil and either powdered eggs or honey.

To prepare, just mix the ingredients specified in the tables below according to how much milk you want to make along with the desired fat content. It helps to use a shaker or a whisk but even a fork stirred vigorously works fine.

Keep in mind that the mixture is not homogenized so over time it will begin to separate again. If it does just shake it up, whisk it, or stir vigorously and viola! you got yourself some great tasting powdered milk. Try both recipes to see which one you and your family prefers (I’m partial to the honey mixture). Enjoy!

Using Honey

Desired
Fat Content
Desired
Milk
Honey Reconstituted
Powdered Milk
Vegetable Oil
1% Cup
Quart
Gallon
1/4t
1t
1T + 1t
1 cup
1 quart
1 gallon
1/2t
2t
2T + 2t
2% Cup
Quart
Gallon
1/2t
1/2T + 1/2t
2-1/2 T
1 cup
1 quart
1 gallon
1t
1T + 1t
1/4C + 1T
Whole (4%) Cup
Quart
Gallon
1t
1T + 1t
5T
1 cup
1 quart
1 gallon
2t
2T + 2t
1/2C + 2T

Using Powdered Eggs

Desired
Fat Content
Desired
Milk
Egg Powder Reconstituted
Powdered Milk
Vegetable Oil
1% Cup
Quart
Gallon
1/8t
1/4t
1t
1 cup
1 quart
1 gallon
1/2t
2t
2T + 2t
2% Cup
Quart
Gallon
1/4t
1/2t
2t
1 cup
1 quart
1 gallon
1t
1T + 1t
1/4C + 1T
Whole (4%) Cup
Quart
Gallon
1/2t
1t
1T,+1t
1 cup
1 quart
1 gallon
2t
2T + 2t
1/2C + 2T

Copyright © 2017 Tactical Intelligence. All Rights Reserved

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9 Comments»

Comment by James
2010-06-24 13:57:21

Going to Wal-Mart today to buy some more tuna and salmon (since I think I can eat them now) will buy some powdered eggs and milk. I have been eying the milk, but who knew there were powdered eggs (though I am a little paranoid of the sound of it or how an egg would become powdered… just sounds scary).

 
Comment by Tactical Intelligence
2010-06-28 13:38:17

James, where did you find the powdered eggs? Are they at Walmart? I’ve got to check that out. We get ours online but they kill you with the shipping.

 
Comment by Logan
2011-07-24 09:17:03

Please keep in mind that honey may contain boutlism spores and no honey-containing foods should be fed to milk-dependent infants. Their digestive tract is perfect for the growth of botulism (unlike that of an older child or adult) and the toxin may kill them.

 
Comment by Illoura
2013-06-27 10:50:04

You should only have to worry about botulism in raw honey- MOST honey is NOT raw today (it’s pasteurized). They also recently did an investigative study and found that MOST honey’s you buy (including some labeled ‘organic’) were not even honey… up to 87% of them – you can research brands to find the fake honeys (the fake honeys have gone so far as to add pollen to them to fool normal inspections), or raise bees and cook the honey yourself (for infants), so you know.
Cooked honey doesn’t have all the beneficial properties of raw, (such as the wound-healing properties).

 
Comment by AisLynn
2014-03-30 16:41:26

Have you considered using powdered butter in place of oil? You could still add the powdered honey to sweeten it. But I don’t know that you would then need the emulsifier.

 
Comment by cassidy
2016-09-15 15:45:07

hello im wondering if this is just reg honey..
does the milk mixed with the egg powder have an eggy taste?

 
Comment by qc
2016-11-13 21:40:02

We bought 6 gallon pale of honey pre y2k. Raw honey in a 6 gallon pale as of today we are still eating this honey ! pasteurized honey ? NO way Honey will last years and years if you keep it comfortable cool and dry.. Mine has changed colors to a darker golden brown but I’m here to let you know Pure Raw Honey is Gods gift to us…

 
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