How to Make Baking Powder

by Erich

Baking powder is one of those must-have ingredients in everyone’s pantry. If you plan on cooking any type of cookie, pancake, muffins and so on and you need to have baking powder.

As far as prepping goes, the problem with baking powder is that it’s shelf life is only about 9 to 12 months. And what I’ve seen — especially when it’s been already opened — the shelf life appears to be even shorter than that.

So in an extended SHTF situation, what are you going to do if you need to bake some cookies (only slightly kidding here)?

Well, luckily the core ingredients of baking powder have an indefinite shelflife and there’s a good chance that they are already in your home right now.

How to Make Baking Powder

What You’ll Need:

  • baking soda
  • cream of tartar

The Process:

This process is so simple I don’t even know why I bother to put up pictures but it basically goes like this…

Mix two parts of cream of tartar with one part of baking soda and there you go, you have baking powder.

The “two parts” can be anything from 2 cups to 1 cup, or 2 teaspoons to 1 teaspoon and so on. So, instead of making a huge batch all at once, the best thing to do is just make the little you need at that very moment.

Again, because cream of tartar and baking soda both have an indefinite shelf-life, these are fantastic additions to your long-term storage if they’re not part of it already.

If you like these kinds of tips, but want to go deeper in your preparations be sure to check out my step-by-step prepping program called Prepper Academy.

Take care and stay safe you guys,

– Erich

Copyright © 2017 Tactical Intelligence. All Rights Reserved

RSS feed| Trackback URI

14 Comments»

Comment by Karen
2014-06-29 18:34:00

What is the shelf life of the large cans (81 oz, unopened) of baking powder?

Comment by Tactical Intelligence
2014-07-01 23:38:09

Not sure Karen. Does the packaging mention or have dates stamped on them?

 
 
Comment by Grandma Joyce
2014-06-29 20:58:29

If your baking powder is a little old and doesn’t work right just add more cream of tartar in the same proportions as the original recipe. For 1 cup of baking powder that isn’t working add 1/2 cup of cream of tartar. Rejuvenates it and it works again.

Comment by Tactical Intelligence
2014-07-01 23:37:08

Great tip Joyce! Thanks!

 
 
Comment by Gia
2014-06-29 22:34:43

Just an FYI, if you’re in dire baking straits you can use baking soda in place of baking powder. But baking soda itself has a limited shelf life as well and will lose its potency over time. You can test whether it’s viable or not by blending a teaspoon of vinegar with two of baking soda. If it fizzes, it’s good. If it doesn’t, use it for something else.

Comment by Tactical Intelligence
2014-07-01 23:38:46

Thanks for the great info Gia. I didn’t know about this test.

 
 
Comment by Patrick
2014-06-30 00:08:05

If cream of tatar and baking soda both have unlimited life spans, how come baking powder doesn’t? As you are mixing two solids, no chemical reaction happens.

Comment by Tactical Intelligence
2014-07-01 23:42:41

Hey Patrick,

Good question. Even though they are both solids, they still will react. One is an acid and the other a base and through the ambient moisture in the air, it is enough to cause a reaction and for it to lose its potency prematurely. That’s why they typically also add some sort of starch (like corn starch) in baking powder to help it absorb moisture and prevent this reaction happening too soon.

 
 
Comment by Great Grey
2014-06-30 06:15:41

As long as it sealed so no moisture can get into it, it will stay good. Moisture from the air or another source is what affects the shelf live, so if you can keep it dry it will last much longer when opened. If you live in an arid place it last much longer than if you live in an area with high humidity.

 
Comment by Shawnee
2015-10-30 10:35:39

Hello, of course this post is truly good and I have learned
lot of things from it on the topic of blogging. thanks.

 
Name (required)
E-mail (required - never shown publicly)
URI
Your Comment (smaller size | larger size)
You may use <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong> in your comment.
*

Trackback responses to this post