How to Make a Quick-Access Magnetic Holster

If suddenly faced with a surprise home-invasion (or a robbery at your business), most firearm owners understand the importance of having your firearm available at a moments notice. But constantly carrying it on your person while lounging around the house isn’t comfortable or practical and leaving it out in the open is — for obvious reasons — not a wise thing to do.

To rectify this, there have been a number of manufacturers that have come up with magnetic-type holsters that you can install in strategic, concealed parts of your home (or business) allowing you to place your firearm in whatever room you happen to be in at the time. Some of these magnetic holsters (like the “FAST” holster) goes for upwards of $30 a pop. Why pay this when you can make one yourself that costs around $6 and takes about 5 minutes of your time to put together? Here’s the process:

How to Make a Magnetic Holster

What You’ll Need

  • 3 Ceramic Block Magnets (available at most hardware stores)
  • Wood Paint Stirrer (a wooden ruler works fine too)
  • 1″ diameter Shrink Tubing (available at some hardware stores or automotive stores). You’ll want about 8″ in length (this can be two pieces of commonly sold 4″ as well).

Assembling the Magnetic Holster

Step 1: Lay out the magnets. You’ll want to place the three magnets on the paint stirrer close enough together that side-by-side they can fit within the front and rear sight (for vertical hanging).
Step 2: Slide Shrink Tubing over Magnets and Wood: Next, slide your shrink tubing over the magnets and wood (overlap the tubing if you have two 4″ pieces) leaving about 3/4″ of tubing on either side.
Step 3: Heat the Shrink Tubing: Now using a candle, torch, or heatgun, heat up the tubing until it completely contracts around the wood and magnets.
Step 4: Drill Holes and Cut to Length: Using a wood drill, drill a small hole on either side of the magnets and cut off the excess wood.

That’s it! Pretty easy huh? Now just install them wherever you think appropriate in your home or business. Here’s some examples:

Some Examples on Where to Install the Magnetic Holsters

*A quick note on safety: These magnetic holsters can be installed pretty much anywhere you think is appropriate, safe, and easily accessible. If you have small children in the home, I recommend only placing your gun on one of the magnetic holsters when you are in the room (ie watching a movie, working etc.). Guns should definitely NOT be left unattended around the house attached to these types of holsters when there are little, curious hands about. Also be mindful of local laws.

In a Closet

In this picture you can see my Walther PPK can be attached to this type of holster just as easily as my Glock.

Under a Table

Storing your firearm under a coffee table or workbench makes your firearm easily accessible while you’re working or watching television. In this picture you can see it hanging in a vertical position.

Beside your Bed

It’s a good idea to keep your firearm close by while sleeping.

Video Example

Also, check out this quick video I put together showing how easy it is to grab and store a firearm with one of these holsters:

Resources

Many thanks to SafeArmsReview for the inspiration behind this idea!

Copyright © 2014 Tactical Intelligence. All Rights Reserved

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27 Comments»

Comment by Evan
2010-11-22 21:22:11

Just made some of these. Great idea! I saw some advertised that were premade for about $30 apiece but I just made 3 for under $20. Thanks so much for the idea, your website is great and now I have a great Christmas present for my dad and brother-in-law!

 
Comment by Evan
2010-11-22 21:46:10

I should mention I used electrical tape instead of the shrink-tubing. A bit cheaper and seems to work great so far.

Comment by TacticalIntelligence
2010-11-22 23:35:26

Evan,

Great idea with the electrical tape. I’ll have to try that out – especially since it’s cheaper.

 
 
Comment by KevinTheNurse
2010-11-25 15:39:55

GREAT POST!!!!!

Thanks for sharing such a great idea. Can’t wait to try this out!

Comment by TacticalIntelligence
2010-11-26 14:45:33

Kevin,

You’re very welcome. Be sure to post any updates if you figure out a different way of doing things.

 
 
Comment by Jordan
2010-12-06 15:01:51

Wow….this is a great idea, and one of the reasons i come to this site weekly. You never cease to amaze me. (i also now have a gift for my father) Thanks! Keep up the good work!

Comment by Tactical Intelligence
2010-12-10 06:25:54

Thanks Jordan!

It’s comments like yours that keep me writing.

 
 
Comment by JHansen
2010-12-30 20:22:19

Do you keep these firearms on magnets loaded? Do you have children to worry about?

Comment by TacticalIntelligence
2010-12-31 14:33:06

I do. See my safety note under the “Some Examples on Where to Install the Magnetic Holsters” section above. If you have little ones be sure to be absolutely vigilant about it.

 
 
Comment by Benno Vyfvinkel
2011-02-13 19:25:29

for electrical tape, have the be under the paint stick to prevent unraveling.

 
Comment by ZACK APPERSON
2011-06-29 15:06:07

SEEING THIS GAVE ME AN IDEA. BEING A USED CAR DEALER, WE USE “DEALER TAG MAGNETS” TO PUT TAGS ON CARS. PRICES RANGE FROM $5.50-$8.50 EACH. CAN BE BOUGHT AT DEALER SUPPLY STORES AND AUTO PARTS STORES. I JUST TRIED ONE AND IT WORKS PERFECT. ZACK, NORTH CAROLINA

Comment by Tactical Intelligence
2011-06-29 15:16:42

Zack,

Great tip. I just checked out those magnets online and they already have the protective layer on the outside that would keep it from scratching one’s firearms (makes sense so it doesn’t scratch the car). These seem ready to use out of the box. Thanks again!

 
 
Comment by Dan
2012-01-24 23:02:02

…Thanks for the great idea. I did a lot of web searches for a bedside holster. When I changed my search criteria to ask, “how to make my own?”, it didn’t take long to come across your site and I immediately tried it out. Very easy to make but I didn’t want to drill holes to mount mine so I simply used hook and loop with adhesive peel and stick, they work great…I have one on both sides of our bed and am now confident I can acquire my grip correctly without fumbling for it in the dark…I’ll be making some as gifts for friends and family. Thanks again…

2012-01-25 21:26:27

You’re very welcome. Thanks for visiting!

 
 
Comment by Kevin
2012-06-12 13:13:05

I’m worried that over time the pistol and it’s parts will become magnetized causing problems like the ejector not working properly.

 
Comment by Bob
2012-08-28 22:52:29

Good idea, but please remind me not to come to your house.. Many a meth cook not that paranoid.

 
Comment by Bob
2012-08-28 22:56:01

If electrical tape gets very hot it shrinks a little and leaves a sticky trail. And it also gets very brittle over time. Shrink wrap is much better. But they also make rubber shrink tape which is good too. It’s in the plumbing section.

 
Comment by Jeff
2013-04-11 21:32:14

i used duck tape instead of shrink, effing love it

 
Comment by Jeff
2013-04-11 21:32:43

black duck tape :D

 
Comment by steve
2013-04-12 14:03:40

yes made some two its easy ,and write on the chrislmas present

 
Comment by steve
2013-04-12 14:06:06

do you think that will be a problem thtas a good comment

 
Comment by Lisa Stauffer
2013-06-02 10:50:37

I just came cross this site and was ready to buy the supplies. Then I saw the question about magnetizing the other metal interior parts of the firearm. Have you noticed any problems at the range with any FTF, FTE etc? I think this a great idea, and much less expensive than the one I saw at the gun show. Thanks for any info Lisa

 
Comment by Dustin
2014-01-01 15:14:28

Great write up. As far as magnetizing, the internal workings of your gun are mechanical and will easily overcome any magnetic field that may exist in the gun, as it will be too weak to cause any issues. Oh, and the brass/lead/copper/aluminum ammo you’re shooting isn’t magnetic either. You’ll likely have more FTF/FTE due to infrequent cleaning or low quality ammo.

 
Comment by Lloyd Christmas
2014-06-03 18:14:10

This concept had been around a long time, and it is definitely useful for quick and easy access, however one should also keep in mind the effects of storing a pistol under such conditions. The magnet is exerting force on pins, springs, and other plunger parts, and over time this may warp these parts and ruin the integrity of the pistol.

Comment by Tactical Intelligence
2014-06-04 21:58:46

Some good thoughts Lloyd. I think it would also depends on the firearm you’re using. Some have more components (springs, pins, etc) than others. So far, with my Glock, I’ve been storing it like this for around 2 years without any issues on firing or function.

 
 
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