How to Make a Candle Heater

With the cold season coming to a close I wanted to share one more survival craft that you can do in order to provide some off-grid heat to a small insulated area with just a candle!

I got this idea straight from the HeatStick.com site, where instead of ordering one of their “Kandle Heeters” I decided to make my own and share with you guys how you can too (it cost me about 15 bucks to make compared to 30 dollars (plus shipping) if you were to buy one).

How it Works

The basic purpose of this heater is to capture the heat given off of a candle flame and to concentrate it into a steel and ceramic radiator assembly. After some time, the ceramic surface will act as a thermal mass and begin to radiate the captured thermal energy into your room or office. Here’s how heatstick.com describes it (image and description c/o heatstick.com):

  1. Heat rising from a burning candle (or electric lamp) is first trapped in the Steel Inner Core and surrounding Ceramic Inner Module.
  2. The Inner Cores get very hot and radiate heat to the Ceramic Middle Core.
  3. This Entire Inner Region gets VERY VERY HOT!! Heat synergistically builds up and “boils out” of the Ceramic Inner Core into the Ceramic Middle Core. The Middle Core heats up and begins to Radiate Heat. Heated air “boils out” into the Ceramic Outer Core.
  4. The Large Surface Area of the Outer Core begins receiving Heat. The inner wall surfaces become very HOT! Heat travels through the wall to the Outer Surface.
  5. The Outer Surface gets VERY WARM to HOT and gently begins to Radiate Heat into your home or office.

Putting it all Together

The process for putting together the candle heater is very simple:

What You Need

  • one 4″ ceramic (not glazed) pot
  • one 2″ ceramic (not glazed) pot
  • one 1 1/2″ ceramic (not glazed) pot
  • two 1 1/2″ x 1/4″ washers
  • three 1 1/4″ x 1/4″ washers
  • three 1″ x 1/4″ washers
  • eight 3/4″ x 1/4″ washers
  • seven 1/4″ nuts
  • one 3″ x 1/4″ bolt

Assembly Instructions

I think that the easiest way for you to learn how to put one of these heaters together is to follow the cutout image (to the left) I used from the heatstick.com site:

Just place the washers and nuts in the right combination as the image and you’ll be good to go. Looking inside, it should look something like this:

Making the Stand

I found the simplest stand to make is to purchase three 4″ corner braces.
Then just put the three braces together with the middle brace facing the opposite direction and bend the outside two just enough to support the heater.

Test Results

I decided to test out the heater with the bacon-grease candle I had made (check out Homemade Lamps from Everyday Objects to learn how to make your own). Since the homemade candle jar was a bit bigger than the 4.5″ stand I made, I added 6″ corner brace extensions to support the larger candle.

After burning the heater for around 6 hours it seemed to be putting out only a small amount of heat (a decent amount of heat was pouring out from underneath though). However, since the weather has been warmer around here I wasn’t able to give this little heater a fair shake (and besides, how much heat output are you really expecting from a candle anyways?).

Despite the less-than-optimal testing conditions, still, in no way would it heat up your home (or even a normal size room for that matter), but in an enclosed area like your car I could see it having some benefit. Again I haven’t been able to truly test it so this is only conjecture.

Even though the heater doesn’t seem all that effective, making this contraption was far from a waste of time. I learned some important principles as well as came up with other ideas of how to convert a flame source to radiant heating (just think of a larger version of this heater combined with the rocket stove I reviewed and you’ll get what I mean).

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128 Comments»

2010-04-12 21:26:08

Very cool how to article. It looks like a simple enough project, but kind of expensive for what you get.

It seems to me that if you have these things already, you could make them, and if you have to burn the candles for light, you might as well use it as the heater too and get a tiny bit of heat if at all possible.

I’m interested to hear more about your larger version. You mentioned the rocket stove, but what about a homemade alcohol stove as the power source? Cheap and easy to find fuel.

 
Comment by Tactical Intelligence
2010-04-12 22:18:03

Lucas,

You’re absolutely right. Although it’s a cool idea, I’m not too impressed by this heater. The alcohol stove/thermal mass heater idea is a great one and I’ll see if I can incorporate it into my future testings with a larger version. Thanks for the great comment!

- Erich

Comment by grayc
2012-09-24 06:20:25

I love this. I think if you have NO heat at all….A little is better than none. I’m just saying…

 
 
Comment by Doug
2010-04-18 18:13:17

The concept is true and it is a sufficient amount of heat to survive but alcohol is a much better and cheaper way of heating since it burns hotter than a candle. Doug Strawn

Comment by Tactical Intelligence
2010-04-22 22:17:01

I agree Doug. I’m planning on incorporating an alcohol stove in my future testing.

 
 
Comment by Ralph Dennis Marlow
2010-09-13 07:55:26

Nothing like copying someone elses idea is there? I bet you wish you thought of it first. I’ll have to give it to you at least you stated where you gleaned the info. There is a much better way to make a candle heater however.

Comment by Tactical Intelligence
2010-09-13 12:31:40

We’d love to hear it. Feel free to chime in any time for the benefit of all.

 
 
Comment by Lisa
2010-09-15 14:00:11

Place 2 bricks on each side of the candle that is sitting on a brick and 2 in the back, like a little fireplace,Put the Terra cotta pots on top of the bricks. It works great. It actually does give off heat. .

Comment by Tactical Intelligence
2010-09-15 14:27:59

Awesome tip Lisa, thanks!

I’ll be trying that one soon.

 
 
Comment by Mike Graf
2010-10-28 19:57:49

In the end, you’re not increasing the amount of heat given off by the candle.. that is pretty much set (unless you modify it to burn more efficiently). You’re localizing the heat and slowing its release into the surroundings. The heat may be in a better place (near the floor and your feet) compared to if it rises to the ceiling though.

 
Comment by bugman702
2011-01-21 10:03:48

Something a little off track but still with a candle. If outside and you have a candle and a poncho, sit on something insulating like a pack. Put the poncho over you and light the candle. Hold it in your lap while keeping the poncho away from your chest. It will warm you right up.

Comment by TacticalIntelligence
2011-01-21 11:51:35

That’s a fantastic tip. I’ve done this method of heating with my wool blanket while doing winter survival excursions — very effective. Thanks for bringing it to everyone’s attention.

 
 
Comment by John
2011-09-25 21:22:06

I just wanted to let your readers know that I placed a post on the tiny house blog about indoor air quality in tiny houses. I discussed this open flame heat inside small spaces.

Any open flame or fire inside of a home that is not vented is flirting with danger.

I’d encourage the readers using fuel to cook, heat or heat hot water inside of a home, RV, tent of living space to find out all you can about CO. A silent and deadly killer.

Here is the link:
http://tinyhouseblog.com/tiny-house/tiny-houses-and-indoor-air-quality-part-1/

Stay safe

J C

 
Comment by Jeff
2012-04-06 16:55:42

I would think that 3 of these could warm a small, closed off room. will experiment.

Comment by Tactical Intelligence
2012-04-10 07:44:38

Jeff,

Do let us know how it turns out.

 
 
Comment by Derek
2012-10-06 09:27:07

Well I live in Ireland,and i use eight Tealight smokeless ones in glass holders placed around the room and i get room up to 24C and room is large costs me a fraction of what would be to use Gas heating yes it works and they burn for 4 hours.I buy packs of 100 tealights in IKEA costs 40 cent for eight hours heating in this big room thatsin Euro…its a recession buster…….

Comment by Tactical Intelligence
2012-10-07 00:22:26

Thanks for the comment Derek!

 
 
Comment by K R
2012-10-16 19:38:36

Instead of concentric terra cotta pots, howzabout concentric tin cans with a ‘cover’ can to prevent burns and tent fires. Also either a multi-wick or multiple candles for more heat. I’ll give it a trym and let ya know. Anyone else wanna do it and keep me in the loop?

Comment by Tactical Intelligence
2012-10-17 01:29:23

Great KR, let us know how it turns out!

 
 
Comment by nulius
2012-10-27 14:39:14

are you sure the middle pot is 2″ ?
I bought exactly the sizes you write and the 2″ looks smaller than yours.
look at the photo.
they are 1 1/2 ” , 2″ and 4″

http://i45.tinypic.com/a4qx6u.jpg

thanks

 
Comment by David
2012-10-28 08:25:02

Hello Derek,

Have you seen the liquid candles that Restaurants use?

 
Comment by elisabeth
2012-11-06 04:04:13

hallo is las dat je een kamer verwarmt met een kaars hoe doe je dat precies ik ben heel erg geinterresseert

 
Comment by Breanne
2012-12-30 14:53:50

To capture the heat lost through the bottom of the candle, why not purchase another ceramic piece as the base?

 
Comment by Nick
2013-01-04 19:20:59

IKEA sell 100 tea lights for 4 euro . that is correct and that makes it 4 cent a candle for 4 hours.if you can continue to release the heat after the candle have burned out it would reduce the price per hour dramatically. if you could get a 4 hour release of heat after the candle has burnt out you pay only 1/2 a pence per hour and your total cost for the 8 hour are 4 pence…..that is not bad at all :)

over 100 hours that adds it up to 1 euro. that is basically 24 hours times 4=just over 4 days for 1 euro. for less than 2 euro you have a whole week of extra heating, :) may good ideas on this post, so im sure we can maximise the heat retention

 
Comment by SurvivorMama
2013-01-17 19:18:18

Good article and feedback. I had made a 1# coffee can / tomato soup can stove (insulated with concrete for stability). A metal teacandle holder in the small saucer fits perfactly, and the heater unit sets on the flatheads otherwise used for a pot support. Now I have a safe and multifunctional unit. Also, when teacandles are finished I reuse the tins to make fireknots for my stove ( biomass firestarters ). They are small, burn within the enclosed space, leave room for small extra sticks and guarantee me a 20 minute high burn with nothing else… Generally enough to boil plenty of water for coffee/tea and a meal. Everything fits in my trunk in a container the size of a child’s shoebox ( when not in use, that is).

 
Comment by simon
2013-01-26 17:19:17

According to Wikipedia a candle gives about 80W heat. I believe if you combine a candle setup with a PC-fan assembly running on a 12v adapter, or a USB port, you would get a decent result. A lot of the effect is in air circulation, so it doesn’t just go straight to the ceiling. I had to put my work desk in front of a radiator, blocking much of it’s effect. So using two PC fans to drag the hot air out. Kind of like this product, which is just about improving circulation. http://www.radiatorbooster.com/

 
Comment by Vincen
2013-02-08 16:35:03

Hey you could always make up like 12 of these things, hang like 3 on each wall, and that may provide enough heat to keep your room warm.

 
Comment by Napalm
2013-02-20 20:18:09

Give man fire and he will stay warm until it’s fuel is consumed.

Set a man on fire and he will stay warm his entire life.

 
Comment by Rick Whitehurst
2013-02-24 00:24:32

I had much better luck putting a candle under the bell of an old brass trumpet but a candle 2 inches under a 16 oz aluminum can with the drinking end cut out and 6-9 pinholes halfway up the sides of the can
is the heater you want.

 
Comment by Bill
2013-03-05 11:57:30

I have an apartment and in the morning the temp is 63F, I bought a huge 3 wik candle from walmart for $12 and burned this under a ceramic flower pot all night. In the morning, only one wik was burning and the whole candle metled down into the 9 inch baking pan where I put the candle but the apartment was at 66F and it was really cold outside. I don’t know at what time the other 2 wiks had stopped but it was still good for it to not be 63F. Also, I want to say that the ceramic was at about 350F with the 3 wiks. The “heater” did not feel hot unless I put my hand close to it however I do believe it was working and the apartment temp felt “natural” and consistent.

 
Comment by docmoffy
2013-03-11 19:34:05

a lot of electronics have heat sinks fitted to them that companies have spent a lot of time and money on research getting right in dissapating heat to the atmosphere to cool electronic equipment has anyone considered using one out of a scrap machine and utilising the money and materials already spent to use as a heat source candle powered recycling ?

 
Comment by Chris
2013-03-22 19:12:12

I just put up a post on how the kandle heeter is basically a scam. Basically, a candle doesn’t produce enough heat to begin with, and if it did, all the ceramic does is slow the heat entering the room. It DOES NOT create heat, that would violate the laws of physics. The ceramic acts as a heat sponge, but a heat sponge for a small amount of candle heat. Dont try heating a room with this method unless you enjoy wasting your time and money.

 
Comment by Cindi
2013-04-26 10:01:40

Chris, do you NOT comprehend when you read? ” still, in no way would it heat up your home (or even a normal size room for that matter),” is what he said. How do you believe you can make people think your smart when you don’t even pay attention to what your reading?
From the heatstick.com site, “This is not a lot of heat so don’t be thinking you are going to heat the house with one!”.
It was not intended to heat a house, however I believe it would warm up my cold bathroom quite nicely!

This is a cute idea. I had ran across that site before and thought is was interesting. I believe I will make one just to do it!

Comment by Tactical Intelligence
2013-04-29 14:06:52

Be sure to let us know how it turns out!

 
 
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Comment by ricm
2013-10-20 12:26:50

I have another idea. Cheaper too.

Buy 2 bread pans ($1 each) at Dollar tree.
Drill holes in the sides of both pans.
Put 1 or more candles into one pan and flip the other on top.
The pans have handles with holes. For safety, bolts can be dropped in the holes so the top won’t flop around.

Adding elements:
The bread pans are tapered, like clay pots, so they stack inside each other.
Multiple ‘tops’ can be bolted and spaced (with nuts). This will allow more air to pass and better distribute the heat.

 
Comment by Timothy
2013-10-25 16:06:34

I first read of something similar 40 years ago in the book The Frontiersman. Its about Simon Kenton, in the late 1700s and early 1800 he helped open the Ohio and Kentucky territories. he describes a survival technique where you dig a hole about the size of your head and fill it with the inner bark of a tree, probably any fine tender would do, he would light one side, cover all but a small area on the other side (to let air in) with dirt, he would sit down with his legs around the fire hole with his blanket around him, the fire would smolder all night long and keep him alive. 200 years ago

 
Comment by peter moss
2013-11-01 17:42:23

Flawed logic. Direct the heat with a fan to pull it into the room towards you. the ambient air temperature will be closer to your own body temp. You won’t feel as cold. Do I agree that 1 tea candle is enough. No, use 2 or 3.

Oh, and your link to the blog… You lose credibility once you start using all caps to yell at the users. Use facts not emotion.

 
Comment by peter moss
2013-11-01 17:43:51

apologies, the previous comment was directed at Chris

 
Comment by peter moss
2013-11-01 18:07:02

2 weeks with no power/heat from Hurricane Sandy taught me an important lesson on being more prepared. Ideas and projects such as this can only help!

 
Comment by Phil
2013-11-01 22:47:41

I put 4 ikea tealights In a 8 x11 Pyrex baking pan . On top of the candles I have the larger 8 inch unglazed pot with a smaller I’d say approx 6 inch pot crudely bolted together
With a spacer of about 2 inches between them. Spacer is an aluminum cylinder from an old bicycle neck that I had laying around.I used gorilla tape to fasten the tray to my nightstand. It burns for 4 hrs gets to be approx 120degrees using a meat thermometer and keeps me quite cozy. Nightstand is about 2 feet from where I sleep. Can’t keep my hands on the outside pot for longer than 3-4 sec. Definately cozying thing up in my bed room. The bolt Is short so it doesn’t come close to touching the flames at all and I don’t have all those washers either just a few . I’m wondering if I should used a longer bolt and more washers to make it better, but I like it the way it is just fine. Trying to think of ways to make it better if I come up with any Ill share my ideas. I think two larger pots and 4 tea lights is the way to go.

 
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Comment by Jen
2013-11-06 01:40:23

Tin cans would be less effective since the purpose of the terracotta is to collect and more slowly disperse the heat. Metal cans are much more highly conductive than terracotta. If you’re looking to make a more effective collector, then glass would be the ticket since it is less conductive than pottery, but it would get potentially much hotter and take longer for the apparatus to heat up fully.
It would also behoove the user to utilize some sort of glass or ceramic cap over the top of the bolt+nut+washer condenser to prevent rapid heat loss off the top of the metal condenser. This could be another large layer utilizing a thermal epoxy to secure a final, larger pot/glass over the entire apparatus or a very small pot/glass cap.
A previous poster also pointed out utilizing bricks around the entire thing—leaving enough gappage/space to allow for oxygen intake for the flame—which is a great way to collect more heat.

Comment by Tactical Intelligence
2013-11-06 02:50:08

Great tips Jen. Thanks for the expert advice!

 
 
Comment by William Burgess Leavenworth
2013-11-09 17:54:16

Better not try this in a car; you are likely to kill yourself with carbon monoxide poisoning. In a small room, it will work. You can also put two of these radiators on a two-burner Coleman camp stove with cheap propane tanks and generate enough heat to warm a decent-sized room. Again, only with windows cracked in the room. CO poisoning is an ugly way to go.

 
Comment by Al
2013-11-12 08:59:04

Well I reckon that a candle in the middle of your room uncovered will provide you with as much useful heat as the contraptions described here. Yes the pots get hot, but it is all about the candle from which the light and heat comes. The pots don’t make more heat.
I think a useful analogy is the difference between an open fireplace and a contained slow combustion heater. The purpose of the slow combustion heater aside from being a safer option in your home is to slow down the fuel consumption, but possibly at the expense of heat intensity over a given time period. Putting candles under a pot or two or three does not change how much heat is given out nor control the speed of combustion. So if you want more heat from a candle, don’t put it under a pot………buy another candle.

 
Comment by Jasmine
2013-11-13 04:57:35

Hi There
I just saw this idea on my Facebook feed the other and have become fascinated by the whole idea. Even though summer is trying to start here, I nights are cool enough to warrant trialling this idea.
Thanks for the shopping list, I have the posts, now need the washers and bolt.
I love the thought of living off the grid.
Jas

 
Comment by stefan
2013-11-13 19:55:13

hi i have opted for the two pot option i use a small pot and block the the top hole with a coin then over that a larger pot with the hole on top open i used 3 tea light candles. i built 3 of these heaters so thats a total of 9 candles and each heater core temp goes well over 100 degrees. i defo do not get a boiling hot room and i would not expect a boiling hot room but what you do get is a nice comfortable room. i use this in my living room that is small but always cold. after installing the heaters it was no longer cold nor was it hot it was just nice.

one thing i did notice tho is the strong smell of candle vapor not sue if this is normal my guess im not leaving enough space between the candle and the pot therefor the candle wax is evaporating like steam.

 
Comment by Benjama
2013-11-14 07:37:28

Need more candle power!

 
Comment by London
2013-11-17 18:35:36

According to heatstick.com the terracotta pots must be heated for 8-10 hours to completely dry them out so they’ll work at maximum efficiency. I’d give it another go with a longer test time. I’m pretty skeptical myself, but my room gets pretty cold, so I think I’ll try to make one using their “GlowWarm” electric candle idea (not sure why they trademarked it, it’s literally just a lightbulb in a ceramic lamp base)

 
Comment by johnson
2013-11-19 11:54:53

The candle heaters if built correctly put out enough heat to easily warm up around your coffee table. You need the outer pots to heat up as well as the inner pots, the one pot in the picture above isn’t doing anything but trapping soot. I’ve made a few of these and I’m still impressed by them. A larger base that fits more candles and larger pots, ( Dollar store bread pan and a glass candle with some tea candles. Poke some air holes in the pan to draw cold air in) It cranks heat out if its in a smaller room and it’s not too drafty.

 
Comment by Rev. Kobutsu Malone
2013-11-20 13:45:29

Physics

This article is highly misleading to those without a scientific background. The bottom line is that you can’t create any more heat from a candle than what is there already… if you are storing the heat in a “thermal mass” or storing the heat in the mass of the air of the room… there can be no net gain unless more energy is introduced into the system. Constructing the above contraption is a complete waste of time, you can’t get around the laws of thermodynamics with a few flower pots! NO Magic!

 
Comment by london
2013-11-20 16:01:52

No one said anything about increasing the total heat generated by the candle. It simply stores the heat inside the pots and radiates the heat outwards in a small radius instead of letting all the heat rise to the ceiling. It’s about the location and perception of the heat, not magically creating energy.

 
Comment by Jacob
2013-11-20 19:49:38

CO of course is a great thing to be mindful off. But is burning 4 tealights/ or the type of candle they’re describing really so big of a threat? It’s not like creating a fireplace without a chimney or a woodstove with no pipe :/ people use candles in their homes all the time without CO problems, no?

 
Comment by Celeste
2013-11-30 13:17:37

There are variations of this concept going around, I, myself made one. I found that the extra baffles make a difference in heat out put. They’re nice to take the chill off a small room.

 
Comment by mk
2013-11-30 16:29:52

Hi I really like the blog and as I live in the North of Scotland I would be interested in heating at a low cost. Instead of using a candle I was thinking about adding a ceramic thing??? above my central heating radiators so it would prolong the heat. Just wanting to get other peoples thoughts. I guess I want to have my heating on for shorter periods. I already have silver foil behind my radiators. Thanks in advance for any advice.

 
Comment by mk
2013-12-01 12:41:22

Hi Just found this article on BBC about possible small cancer increase with burning candles, It states the following http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/8211543.stm

Candle use linked to cancer risk
Experts say rooms should be ventilated when burning candles
Candle-lit dinners may be romantic, but researchers are warning they could be harmful to health.
South Carolina State University experts analysed the fumes released by burning candles in lab tests.

They found paraffin wax candles gave off harmful fumes linked to lung cancer and asthma – but admitted it would take many years’ use to risk health.

UK experts said smoking, obesity and alcohol were much more important in terms of cancer development.
And even the researchers admitted occasional candle use was not something people should worry about too much.
In terms of cancer, a far more significant type of indoor air pollution is second-hand cigarette smoke
Joanna Owens, Cancer Research UK
Researcher Amid Hamidi said people who frequently used candles, for instance to help them relax in the bath or provide the right ambience for dinner, were most at risk.
He told the American Chemical Society in Washington: “An occasional paraffin candle and its emissions will not likely affect you.

“But lighting many paraffin candles every day for years or lighting them frequently in an un-ventilated bathroom around a tub, for example, may cause problems.”

The scientists suggested switching to candles made from beeswax or soy, which did not release significant levels of the chemicals. “

 
Comment by carolina
2013-12-02 11:00:52

Hi my mom is on oxygen is this safe for her to use I want to get her one because she is always cold ?

 
Comment by Gareth
2013-12-03 19:09:14

NO, do not use this around anyone on oxygen, results may be deadly.

 
Comment by GEE
2013-12-04 04:36:04

we use candles in the car to stay warm at rest stops verses leaving the car running. and yes it does work if you set the candles in a bread pan with the 2 ceramic pots on top of each and 3 candles in the pan. after it warms the pots a small fan on low will help move the heat around. and yes the pots do get very hot. we did this in the ice storm a few years ago. we didn’t use the fans when the power was out `18 days. depending on the room size is the factor as to how many you need. But IT WORKS!!

 
Comment by lilkunta
2013-12-05 22:54:34

hello. I tried this last night and it didnt work. I am in a 7.5 x 10 ft room, but I only need the area next to where I sleep to raise in temp. It was 38°and my nose was so cold!

I have 2 8in glass jar religious candles (this http://www.dollartree.com/household/home-decor/candles-candleholders/Glass-Jar-Candles-8-/500c542c544p334989/index.pro ).I’m using this instead of tea lights because these 8in candles wil burn about 8hrs so it will be on all night and I’ll hopefully be warm).

I have a 2 terracotta clay pots(non glazed from Home Depot); one is 8in ( http://www.homedepot.com/p/Norcal-Pottery-8-25-in-Terra-Cotta-Pot-100043015/100333339#.UqE71eL3MqY ) and the second is 10in( http://www.homedepot.com/p/Norcal-Pottery-10-in-Terra-Cotta-Pot-100043017/100332085?N=%2FNtk-All%2FNtt-clay%252Bpot#.UqE8IuL3MqY ) .

I have foil on the 8in pot’s hole. the foil isn’t reynolds brand, it is the restaurant kid that pulls out in rectangles.
The 8in got warm but never too hot to touch. The temp next to the pots didnt raise.
When i checked a second time one of the candles ‘s flames went out. i relit it.

What am i doing wrong? Wrong candles? Pots to big ? Wrong foil?
Thanks.

 
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Comment by riaz
2013-12-10 11:29:27

u r doing the best.God help u.keep up ur struggle.it will b great service to mankind & animalkind. engr.riaz

 
Comment by JoAnn
2013-12-17 11:17:35

Awesome idea. I wonder if terracotta pots come in oblong shapes. You could use the bricks and three candles to get more heat. Right now, I am freezing and trying to find something off the grid to heat with.

 
Comment by Gordon Chamberlain
2013-12-23 15:51:34

I would like to suggest that this many bolts and washers are not needed as each pot hangs down from above. The extra amount are there to prevent movement which is not an issue. It does provide extra mass thought . Easier is to just add several clay post on top to increase mass.

 
Comment by Lesa
2013-12-28 13:17:48

HI,

I bought, tested and used one of these original Kandle Heeters for the past year. I travel and live in my mini RV which is an older model Chevy Van. I have many allergies and sensitivities to environmental, chemicals, dusts and stuff as well as foods. I have found that it is easier for me to manage my enviroment in the smaller space of the van than in stick built apartments or homes or larger commercially manufactured homes. Last week I met a woman, less fortunate than me. She had a vintage travel trailer with NO heat and simply had a plant pot over a propane stove burner. We made a deal, after she saw how well the Kandle Heeter kept my van warm, taking the chill off and with ventalation allowed me to sleep with it running…. this morning is chilly and I miss my heeter! If you would like mire information, please check for an upcoming post in colaboration with Bob at cheaprvliving.com/blog

 
Comment by sandra
2013-12-31 12:30:06

There is an easier version of this on youtube. Power went out during the ice storm in Michigan and I made one. It helped a lot! I used over 200 candles this past week.
It works. Will be adding to the flower pots just in case!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brHqBcZqNzE

 
Comment by Michael
2014-01-01 08:56:51

Candle power.

 
Comment by Glen C
2014-01-03 16:09:04

This is an idea for people to be able to contain the heat and release it to a specific area. While you are correct, I think you are missing the point.

 
Comment by barbara
2014-01-03 16:31:24

I would love to make this…I don’t understand how. You take the tomato soup can, and then put that inside the coffee can, and pour concrete around it? So its embedded in the concrete inside the coffee can? Is that correct? Then the tea light sits inside the tomato soup can. But where do the flower pots go? Or do you skip them altogether.

 
Comment by c. cooper
2014-01-05 00:31:16

Actually you are correct. the problem with the design is that there is too much heat loss below the flower pots and there for it doesn’t work well . the brick idea would eliminate this design flaw

 
Comment by Chase
2014-01-05 16:49:30

If you use a high temp paint (automotive engine paint) the outer pot can be decorated to fit the room.

 
Comment by Bob Dole
2014-01-06 02:10:24

http://www.whydontyoutrythis.com/2013/11/how-to-easily-heat-your-home-using-flower-pots-and-tea-lights.html

This guy says his provides enough heat for a room or home for 8 hours. I think the problem you have is that the heat is all escaping from the bottom and you need something like the bread tin to force it up into the pots and not down and away.

 
Comment by Carl
2014-01-06 09:54:30

Hmmm I think the tin cans would dissipate the heat too quickly, the terracotta pots store the heat more efficiently and then release it. Tin cans have less mass and therefore less storage capabilities transferring the heat too quickly to be efficient, I could be wrong though ;)

 
Comment by Carl
2014-01-06 10:18:10

Remember., it’s not about creating more heat, but how to economically use the heat generated and control it’s release, long after the candles have burned, the terracotta pots continue to give out the heat they have stored, tin cans would release the heat way quicker as they are more conductive and have less mass allowing the stored heat to be transferred to the air quicker. The terracotta pots just act as a heat exchange unit.

 
Comment by Eileen
2014-01-06 15:34:28

First off, the candle fuel makes a difference. Switch to beeswax, which is clean burning and produces more heat. Second, the candle flame needs to be inside the pots. I think you would see a huge difference with these two improvements. Thanks for the post.

 
Comment by Denise Baillie
2014-01-07 09:46:38

This looks like a great idea, but I think the pots need to be closer to the candle – too much heat would be lost with them so far above. Secondly, “with the cold weather coming to a close”!? Honey, I don’t know where you are, but here it’s just getting started!

 
Comment by Penny
2014-01-07 10:26:16

have you tried it with metal inside the top plant pot like metal coils in their. metal seems to capture and amplify the heat. if it has a slow steady heat.

 
Comment by ade
2014-01-07 17:30:39

Tell us then instead of dissing him

 
Comment by Memi
2014-01-07 21:04:12

Could also replace one of the inner pots with a metal flower pot…it would then get hotter and retain the heat longer.

 
Comment by Joan
2014-01-07 23:15:41

If you use cans as in the largest coffee cans or the very large cans for day cares, schools, ect, you can make them into a form of a bunsen(sp?) burner and actually cook on top them. You can melt paraffin wax into a emptied and cleaned tuna can add a wick and there you go. We did this when I was young and in girl scouts. It really works

 
Comment by mamamouse
2014-01-08 02:12:21

Kind of like the brick grandma put in the beds at night after heating them on the wood stove.

 
Comment by Wanda Boomhower
2014-01-08 08:31:49

How cold is the outside temperature when you heat your room like this?

 
Comment by Ted
2014-01-12 08:30:18

What hasn’t at one time been reported to be linked to creating cancer or is next on the list?

 
Comment by Ted
2014-01-12 08:33:07

Response was to MK

 
Comment by Ted
2014-01-12 08:37:59

Also, to all the comments saying that it was purported to create more heat and a scam. I have yet tried to find that statement by anyone. The idea is to retain some of the heat and disperse it more evenly. It would be nice for those who like to slam and bully ideas to learn to read and comprehend first.

 
Comment by Roberto Rodriguez
2014-01-13 11:19:12

If you have been outside in an enclosed fishing or hunting blind at below freezing temperatures you appreciated the warmth created by a small heater like this. All the words in the world cannot substitute for real experience. The laws of thermodynamics and the use of thermal mass work to keep you warm.

 
Comment by Amy
2014-01-16 15:25:20

Hi everyone! Thanks for the useful posts! I’m new to this, and have never made one of these. I do make things out of clay, and I’m about to experiment with making a pot specifically designed for this purpose. Can anyone here tell me if it is necessary to have the three pots with air in the middle, and are the metal nuts and bolts necessary? I’m thinking one thick clay pot, shaped more like a chiminea (sp?) that covers the entire candle (made for a big candle) with holes at the bottom, and one hole at the top, may work? Any thoughts?

 
Comment by Adel
2014-01-24 03:27:17

can we use salt in the system to generate more heat? Just think how to store the salt between the last two pots and allow for air to go above it
Any creative ideas for this will be highly appreciated

 
Comment by Gini
2014-01-25 18:19:29

The original video I saw on this used 2 clay pots and tea lights perched on top of a bread pan. The inner pot had a left over smashed tea light cup covering the hole of the pot and the larger clay pot over the inner pot. I think that what is supposed to happen is that the pots heat up and the hot air comes out of the top of the pot. Haven’t had a chance to try this yet, but I think it would work better with just two pots and the hole in the top pot rather than the one with the metal post in the middle covering the hole. Be very careful how hot you get the clay pots because they could break. I would definitely use a metal bread pan rather than the posts. this is a good idea and can’t wait to try it. Oh, by the way, I don’t think that burning candles in a closed room is going to produce enough carbon dioxide to kill anyone unless you are going to burn a lot of them at one time.

 
Comment by r dondero sr
2014-01-25 22:10:55

i am going to try 3 candle heaters set on quart mason jars filled with water the heat from the candles should heat the water some. then it will release it overnight. thanks for the info

 
Comment by Isaac
2014-01-28 01:14:35

Finally someone else who paid attention in science class!!

 
Comment by JHawx
2014-01-29 16:38:33

Looks really interresting and it is actually a great gift idea.
I am planning of making one for my grandma, who likes to burn some candles at time to time.
Howeveer, i got improvement ideas as i saw this.
1.inside the innermost and middle pot, you have used nuts. I would use copperwashers instead and using large washer, small washer, and just alternating em you could make an radiator, this works better to capture the heat and is known from computer heatsinks.
* this would also make more efficient heat catcher.
2. Replacing the bottom pot with metallic one and by drilling small holes ontop of it, would further add capasity to catch the heat.
3. By adding pebbles near the candle, you can make this more ornate, + it will further add the heat element: the stones will get hot, and release some heat slowly.

But again, if you only want the heating element, these additions may be optional. If you want to make ornate gift… well…

 
Comment by BillyC
2014-02-12 13:06:59

Why bother with the flower pots and just light the candle? Do the flower pots magically bring heat from somewhere else? No, they do not. If they are a thermal mass, they are a puny one and can just as well be filled with dirt and a plant. This looks dangerous. A way to overhat the wax until it bursts into flames without needing a wick.

 
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Comment by Bill T.
2014-03-05 01:01:23

I don’t think this clay pot heater idea would work. I have a Coghlan’s tea light candle lantern. The metal frame gets so hot I literally cannot touch it. When I was homeless, it helped warm up my tent, in addition to giving me some light. I think a camping candle lantern would work better than this thing that must be a pain to build.

 
Comment by SOF
2014-03-24 01:10:07

2 problems with your heater as to why it isn’t heating properly.
1st, theres not enough room between the pots for proper air flow 2nd, the steel in the washers,nuts and bolt are stealing the heat from the ceramic pots.

remove the 2 inner pots, and use just the small inner pot and the large outer pot and discard the nuts bolts and washers. it will work like its supposed to.

all you end up with is 2 pots and some candles, very effective heater for heating a 10X10 space

 
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Comment by lynn
2014-05-23 08:26:24

hi there, would this kind of heater be any good for my greenhouse

Comment by Tactical Intelligence
2014-05-23 15:53:51

It may be of some benefit so long as the greenhouse isn’t too big.

 
 
Comment by Donna Wasman
2014-06-10 20:34:18

I am interested in any cheap methods to keep our small earth home heated. The cost of propane or electricity has just sky rocketed in our area.

 
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